Solon Granite Memorials, Solon Granite Memorial, Solon Monument Company, Solon Headstone Company

Purchasing a granite monument, granite memorial or bronze tombstone for a Solon, Ohio cemetery requires a family to be familiar with many rules and regulations as each Solon Ohio cemetery has unique stipulations. (See several key Solon, Ohio cemetery regulations below). 

For many people selecting a monument is a new and unfamiliar experience. Classic Memorials has more than four generations of helping families choose and create the right monument for their loved one. If you have any questions regarding specific Solon cemetery guidelines and regulations, you can contact us here:

Classic Memorials, Inc.

www.classicmemorialsinc.com

13882 Cedar Rd.

Cleveland, OH 44118

 

Phone Number: (216) 321-6740

Toll-Free: (800) 278-8523

E-Mail: info@classicmemorialsinc.com

 

 

SOLON OHIO LOT DESIGNATION INSCRIPTIONS ON TOMBSTONES

1064.10 
All tombstones installed at the Roselawn Cemetery shall contain a correct description of the section and lot number of the burial lot. All tombstones installed in the Mount Hope Cemetery shall contain a correct description of the lot number of the burial lot.


SOLON OHIO HEADSTONES

1064.11 
All headstones shall be limited to two feet and six inches (2’6”) in height, unless

otherwise waived by the Public Properties Committee for good cause shown. 


SOLON OHIO PLANTINGS

1064.14

A. NO Shrub shall be permitted to be planted, NO glass containers/vases

B. Flower beds may be the width of the base of the memorial stone and not more

than 12 inches in depth.

C. NO flower beds in the center of the lot will be permitted.

D. NO rose bushes or creeping vines will be permitted.

E. NO full grave covering shall be allowed except those that are now in place,

and are currently, and continue to be maintained.

F. NO single plants in the center of the grave shall be permitted.

G. All plantings shall be maintained by lot owners or their agents. Any planting

which is not properly maintained or does not conform to these regulations

shall be removed.

H. Winter decorations may be in place only from November 15th to the last day of February. They will be removed March 1st.

 

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Bronze Memorials, Bronze Monuments, Bronze Headstones, Bronze Grave Markers, Cleveland, Ohio, Northeast, Ohio

Looking to purchase a bronze headstone, bronze tombstone or bronze cemetery marker for a Cleveland or Northeast Ohio cemetery? One consideration should be the rules and regulations of your particular cemetery. For instance, certain cemeteries only allow slant markers and others only allow bronze markers. Before making a decision, please contact Classic Memorials as we have deep knowledge of all cemetery regulations and four generations of experience helping families select the right monument for their loved one. Here are a few examples of bronze memorials.

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Memorial Markers, Memorials Headstones, Monuments Tombstones, Cleveland, Ohio

Are you looking to purchase a headstone, tombstone or cemetery marker for a Cleveland or Northeast Ohio cemetery? One item to consider are the rules and regulations of your particular cemetery. For instance, certain cemeteries only allow slant markers and others only allow flat markers. Before making a decision, please contact Classic Memorials as we have deep knowledge of all cemetery regulations and four generations of experience helping families select the right monument for their loved one. Below are a few standard design options and sizes.  

Monument Types

Monument Measurements

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Monument, Headstone, Tombstone, Grave Marker, Company, Warren Ohio

Purchasing a gravestone, headstone or tombstone for a Warren, Ohio cemetery requires a family to be familiar with many rules and regulations as each Warren Ohio cemetery has unique stipulations. (See several key Warren, Ohio cemetery regulations below).

For many people selecting a monument is a new and unfamiliar experience. Classic Memorials has more than four generations of helping families choose the right monument for their loved one. If you have any questions regarding specific Warren cemetery guidelines and regulations, you can contact us here:

Classic Memorials, Inc.

13882 Cedar Rd.

Cleveland, OH 44118

Phone Number: (216) 321-6740

Toll-Free: (800) 278-8523

E-Mail: info@classicmemorialsinc.com

Warren Ohio Cemeteries:

Barrett Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Basinger Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Bethany Cemetery Warren Lebanon
Bethel Cemetery Warren Oregonia
Bigger Cemetery Warren Monroe
Brannock Cemetery Warren Oregonia
Caesars Creek Cemetery Warren New Burlington
Carlisle Cemetery Warren Franklin
Cline Family Cemetery Warren Mason
Craig Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Crosson Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Deerfield Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Dicks Creek Cemetery Warren Monroe
East Shaker Cemetery Warren Monroe
Ertel Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Eyer Cemetery Warren Springboro
Fellowship Cemetery Warren Monroe
Gheils Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Gibbs Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Gilbert Cemetery Warren Monroe
Graham Cemetery Warren Springboro
Greenwood Cemetery Warren Lebanon
Hatfield Cemetery Warren Lebanon
Hill Cemetery Warren Mason
Hopkinsville Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Howard Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Jones Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Juterboch Farm Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Keller Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Keltner Cemetery Warren Mason
Kirby Cemetery Warren Lebanon
Landaker Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Lebanon Cemetery Warren Lebanon
Long Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Lukens Cemetery Warren Oregonia
Lytle Cemetery Warren Springboro
Maineville Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Miami Cemetery Warren Waynesville
Miami Valley Memorial Garden Warren Springboro
Morrow Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Mount Holly Cemetery Warren Waynesville
Murdock Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
New Hope Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Null Cemetery Warren Springboro
Old Quaker Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Old School Baptist Cemetery Warren Springboro
Old Stone Schoolhouse Cemetery Warren Lebanon
Olive Branch Cemetery Warren Oregonia
Osborne Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Otterbein-Shaker Cemetery Warren Monroe
Pioneer Cemetery Warren Lebanon
Pleasant Grove Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Red Lion Cemetery Warren Monroe
Roachester Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Rose Hill Cemetery Warren Mason
Rossella Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Runyan Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Salem Cemetery Warren Springboro
Seyforth Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Springboro Cemetery Warren Springboro
Spurling Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Stiles Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Tapscott Cemetery Warren Franklin
Templin Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Tiger Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
Turtle Creek Cemetery Warren Oregonia
Union Cemetery Warren Oregonia
Warwick-Rhodes Cemetery Warren Monroe
Wesley Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
West Mary Cemetery Warren Pleasant Plain
Wood Hill Cemetery Warren Franklin
Woodville Cemetery Warren South Lebanon
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Monument Companies in Akron Ohio Headstones, Memorials, Tombstones, Grave Marker

urchasing a gravestone, memorial or tombstone for a Akron, Ohio cemetery requires a family to be familiar with many rules and regulations as each Akron Ohio cemetery has unique stipulations. (See several key Akron, Ohio cemetery regulations below).

 

For many people selecting a monument is a new and unfamiliar experience. Classic Memorials has more than four generations of helping families choose the right monument for their loved one. If you have any questions regarding specific Akron cemetery guidelines and regulations, you can contact us here:

 

 

Classic Memorials, Inc.

13882 Cedar Rd.

Cleveland, OH 44118

 

Phone Number: (216) 321-6740

Toll-Free: (800) 278-8523

 

Alittle bit about an Akron Ohio Cemetery:

 

Glendale Cemetery was charted in 1839. It was registered in the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 for the Historic Landscape and bear the tag line of “The Guardian of Akron’s Heritage Since 1839.” Within the cemetery, the story of Akron unfolds. Past citizens of Akron’s are all buried here from the prominent figures to all social, ethnic, and economic groups. Located right outside of Downtown Akron, the cemetery was originally located in a rural setting. However, the city has grown around it. The preservation of the cemetery is a continuing effort.

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Memorial stones, headstones, tombstones, grave markers, northwest ohio

Headstones Prices, Monuments, Cemetery Markers and Funeral Memorials in Northwest Ohio.

Did you know that five of the most popular terms searched on the internet regarding headstones and monument prices are: cheap headstones, buy headstones, discount headstones, affordable headstones and headstone prices? This is a clear indication that families are looking for the best deal.

For many, purchasing a headstone is a new and unfamiliar experience. And as with most purchases, you typically get what you pay for. When the time comes to commemorate the life of someone very special, many items should be considered. It is a purchase that should be made with great care and consideration as it will last forever.

Quick Tip #1 for Saving on Headstone Purchases

Before families start looking for the best headstone prices, the first thing one must do is check for cemetery guidelines that may regulate the size, type and headstone material. This is critical as purchasing a monument that doesn’t meet cemetery regulations can result in their refusal to install the memorial leaving you in a bind.

Once you know the cemetery rules for headstones, you can start searching for an affordable headstone for your loved one’s grave space.

Need additional guidance? Classic Memorials has four generations of helping Ohio families and can help you.

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Monuments, Headstones, Tombstones, Grave Markers, Lorain County, Lorain, Ohio

Headstones Prices, Monuments, Cemetery Markers and Funeral Memorials in Euclid, Ohio.

 

Did you know that five of the most popular terms searched on the internet regarding headstones and monument prices are: cheap headstones, buy headstones, discount headstones, affordable headstones and headstone prices? This is a clear indication that families are looking for the best deal. 

 

For many, purchasing a headstone is a new and unfamiliar experience. And as with most purchases, you typically get what you pay for. When the time comes to commemorate the life of someone very special, many items should be considered. It is a purchase that should be made with great care and consideration as it will last forever.

 

Quick Tip #1 for Saving on Headstone Purchases

 

Before families start looking for the best headstone prices, the first thing one must do is check for cemetery guidelines that may regulate the size, type and headstone material. This is critical as purchasing a monument that doesn’t meet cemetery regulations can result in their refusal to install the memorial leaving you in a bind.

 

Once you know the cemetery rules for headstones, you can start searching for an affordable headstone for your loved one’s grave space.

 

Need additional guidance? Classic Memorials has four generations of helping Ohio families and can help you.

 

Lorain County, Ohio Cemeteries:

Agudath Achim Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Aldrich Cemetery — Grafton, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Avon Cemetery — Avon, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Beckley Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Belden Cemetery  — Grafton, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Brownhelm Cemetery — Vermilion, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Butternut Ridge Cemetery — North Ridgeville, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Calvary Park — Lorain, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Camden Cemetery — Oberlin, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Charleston Cemetery — Lorain, Lorain, Ohio, United States
City of Elyria Cemetery  — Carlisle, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Claus Family Cemetery — Lorain, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Cleveland Street Cemetery — Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Columbia Township Cemetery — Columbia Station, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Crownhill Cemetery — Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Day Cemetery — Sheffield, Lorain, Ohio, United States
East Cemetery — Oberlin, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Elmhurst Park Cemetery  — Avon, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Elmwood Cemetery — Lorain, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Evergreen Cemetery  — South Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Fields Cemetery — North Ridgeville, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Garfield Cemetery — Sheffield, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Gore Cemetery — Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Greenhoe Cemetery — Medina, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Greenwood Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Henrietta Cemetery — Oberlin, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Henrietta Methodist Cemetery — Wakeman, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery — Avon, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Huntington Center Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Jackson Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Kendeigh Corner Cemetery — Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Knowles Cemetery — LaGrange, Lorain, Ohio, United States
La Grange Cemetery  — LaGrange, Lorain, Ohio, United States
La Porte Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Lake Shore Cemetery — Avon Lake, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Middle Ridge Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
New Brighton Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
North Murray Ridge Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
North Ridgeville Center Cemetery — North Ridgeville, Lorain, Ohio, United States
North Street Cemetery  — Grafton, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Old Brighton Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Penfield Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Pioneer Cemetery — South Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Pioneer Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Pioneer Cemetery — Sheffield Lake, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Ridge Hill Memorial Park — Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Ridgelawn Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Ridgeview Cemetery — North Ridgeville, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Rochester Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Rochester Station Cemetery — Rochester, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Rockwood Cemetery — LaGrange, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Rugby Cemetery — Vermilion, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Saint Josephs Cemetery — Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Saint Marys Catholic Cemetery  — Avon, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Saint Marys Cemetery — Grafton, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Saint Marys Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Saint Peters Cemetery — North Ridgeville, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Saint Teresa Cemetery — Sheffield, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Salem Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
South Murray Ridge Cemetery — Elyria, Lorain, Ohio, United States
South Pittsfield Cemetery — Wellington, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Sugar Ridge Cemetery — North Ridgeville, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Township Cemetery — Amherst, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Universalist Cemetery — New London, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Westwood Cemetery — Oberlin, Lorain, Ohio, United States
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Headstones Prices, Monuments, Cemetery Markers and Funeral Memorials in Euclid, Ohio.

Did you know that five of the most popular terms searched on the internet regarding headstones and monument prices are: cheap headstones, buy headstones, discount headstones, affordable headstones and headstone prices? This is a clear indication that families are looking for the best deal. 

For many, purchasing a headstone is a new and unfamiliar experience. And as with most purchases, you typically get what you pay for. When the time comes to commemorate the life of someone very special, many items should be considered. It is a purchase that should be made with great care and consideration as it will last forever.

Quick Tip #1 for Saving on Headstone Purchases

Before families start looking for the best headstone prices, the first thing one must do is check for cemetery guidelines that may regulate the size, type and headstone material. This is critical as purchasing a monument that doesn’t meet cemetery regulations can result in their refusal to install the memorial leaving you in a bind.

Once you know the cemetery rules for headstones, you can start searching for an affordable headstone for your loved one’s grave space.

Need additional guidance? Classic Memorials has four generations of helping Ohio families and can help you.

Euclid, Ohio Cemeteries:

Euclid Cemetery

20222-20232 Euclid Ave
Euclid, Cuyahoga, Ohio
United States

Saint Paul Cemetery

1201-1231 Chardon Rd
Euclid, Cuyahoga, Ohio
United States

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Headstones Mentor Ohio – Monuments, Cemetery Tombstones, Funeral Monuments,

Mentor, Ohio families have many cemetery choices on where to bury their loved ones. One item to consider when making a cemetery decision are the memorial, grave headstone and funeral marker regulations it stipulates. Each cemetery has many requirements including size, color and material.

Classic Memorials has deep knowledge of each cemetery’s regulations and more than four generations of experience helping families choose the right memorial or monuments for their loved one. If you have any questions regarding specific Mentor, Ohio cemetery guidelines and regulations, you can contact us here:

 

Classic Memorials, Inc.

www.classicmemorialsinc.com

13882 Cedar Rd.

Cleveland, OH 44118

Phone Number: (216) 321-6740

Toll-Free: (800) 278-8523

The City of Mentor Cemetery Guidelines and Rules:

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Cemetery Decoration Rules

The following rules and regulations were developed with the

assistance of a citizen’s advisory group to protect and preserve

the decorum and solmnity of the cemetery. Your cooperation in

observing the rules is appreciated.

Fresh or artificial flowers should be placed in urns, pots, or

flower holders and placed alongside the monument on patio blocks

or the footer extension.

Steel rod hangers are permitted. Single hangers shall be placed

at the side of the monument. Double hangers must be placed flush

along the back of the monument footer. The basket or hook shall

not hang over into the walkway.

All hangers must have a visible

decoration on the hook at all times for the safety of those walking

by the hanger

. Wrapped or decorated steel rod hangers are not

permitted.

No more than one steel rod hanger is permitted at a monument.

Wreaths can be placed at the side of the headstone during the

winter months.

Non-glass eternal flames containing a candle or solar powered

candle, or a solar powered “coach” style lantern may be placed at

the gravesite. The eternal flame should be placed at the side of

the monument. The solar light shall be displayed from a steel rod

hanger.

The following decorations are not permitted:

Glass products or gazing balls; styrofoam; wind chimes, wind

socks, balloons, inflatable decorations, or pinwheels; wood chips,

stones, bricks, etc. in front of or behind the headstones; Wires

or stakes of any kind to anchor decorations; birdhouses or bird

feeders; banners and banner hangers; wrapped decorated steel rod

hangers.

Decoration Placement

Decoration not on the monument must be fully placed on either

patio blocks or footer extensions to permit maintenance and funeral

access. Patio blocks must not be any wider than

the monument

footer, nor extend beyond the gravesite. Footer extensions may be

constructed only by the City of Mentor cemetery staff.

All decorations must be placed at the monument.

It is recommended that

all

decorations be clearly marked with

the section, lot, grave, and name on the base.

Artificial flowers that appear unkempt, and fresh flowers that

have died, will be removed by cemetery staff.

You are permitted to decorate your gravesite only.

To make special arrangements for decoration placement for

special days, such as birthdays or anniversary of death, contact the

Mentor Cemetery office at (440) 974-5733.

Funeral Flowers and Decorations

Decorations and flowers at the time of burial are left on the

grave for three days. Decorations are then removed.

Complete Decoration Removals

Gravesites are to be cleaned of all decorations three times a

year. These dates will be posted on the exit signs

March 1

st

Three weeks after Easter

November 1

st

Please allow two weeks to be sure removal has been completed

before placing new decorations on your gravesite. This will protect

your new decorations from being accidentally removed. Items in

an urn or on a monument will not be removed,

unless

they pertain

to a past holiday, or they are deemed unkempt.

Major holiday decorations such as Memorial Day, Independence

Day, Labor Day, or Halloween, etc. should be removed 14 days

after the holiday.

Wooden Crosses

Wooden crosses are permitted to mark the location of grave-

sites under the following circumstances only:

a.

Until a permanent monument is placed on the site. After the

placement of the monument, the cross will be removed and

taken to the Cemetery Office.

b.

To mark any monument under 18 inches tall from

November 1

st

to March 1

st

.

All crosses shall be constructed of wood and marked with a last

name and the section, lot, and grave. The cross shall not exceed 36

inches above ground. The cross member shall not exceed 18 inches

in width. The cross shall be constructed with 1” x 4” wood only.

Crosses not conforming to these dimensions shall be removed.

Other Cemetery Rules

Speed limit is 15 mph. Please be courteous to pedestrians.

The cemetery closes at dark.

No pets are permitted within the cemetery property.

Recreational activities are not permitted on the cemetery

grounds, such as Frisbee, baseball, golf, skating, skateboarding,

jogging, or picnicking.

The placement of any signs or notices, or soliciting the sale of

any item is not permitted.

No loud music.

The City of Mentor will not be responsible for any broken or

stolen items and reserves the right to remove any articles not in

keeping with the beautification of the cemetery or impeding the

maintenance of the grounds.

The City of Mentor reserves the right to review, revise, add, or

delete rules as necessary. An item not addressed in the rules will be

considered not permitted.

If

you

have

any

questions,

please

call

the

Cemetery

Office

at

(440)

974-5733.

In 1854, a meeting was held at the Mentor Special District

Schoolhouse on Hopkins Road to organize a Cemetery

Association. Members included

residents Thomas Clapp, James

Dickey, Nathan Corning, Robert

Murray II, Stephen Hart, Edward

M. Ingersoll, Martin Sawyer, Sellick

Warren, Schuyler S. Baker, David

Hopkins and Erastus Parmelee. The

Association purchased ten acres

of land “situated in the Jackson lot

and lying on the road from Amasa

Cobb’s corners to David Hopkins’ corners for the consideration

of $400 to be paid in four equal annual installments from the 8

th

day of April 1854 with interest.” The records were recorded on

December 15, 1854.

Amasa Cobb, died on March 16, 1855, and was the first to be

buried in Mentor Cemetery.

Mentor’s original burial site was located on property deeded to

the schools and located at the intersection of Mentor Avenue and

Center Street. In 1858 and 1859, William S. Kerr, the Treasurer of

the Village School Board, was instructed to pay residents for lots

they owned on this property. The plan was to move the burying

grounds to the new Mentor Cemetery, which allowed the School

Board to build a two-story brick schoolhouse on the site of the

former burying grounds.

In 1876, in a peach orchard just south of the cemetery a new

Special District School was built. It operated until 1937 and later

served as the first Mentor Police Station. After the building was

removed, the property became part of the Mentor Cemetery.

Today, the Mentor Municipal Cemetery consists of 60 acres,

with approximately 39 acres in use. To learn more about the history

of the Mentor Cemetery, pick up a copy of “Mentor: The First 200

Years.” It is available from the Mentor Recreation Office and local

book stores.

History of Mentor Cemetery

Self-Guided Field Trip

Since the Mentor Cemetery was founded in 1854 the names of

Reynolds, Munson, Sawyer, Parker, and Garfield have all become

familiar street names in Mentor. But these names also represent

prominent residents whose lives had a profound impact on the

formation of our town. Take this self-guided field trip of this

historic cemetery. We begin with our most prominent family.

Section 15

- GARFIELD

President James A. Garfield became a resident of Mentor

in 1876, when he bought an old farm just west of the center of

town. Large additions were built around the 40-year-old, nine-

room-house in order to accommodate the Congressman, his wife

Lucretia, their five children and the President’s mother. Garfield

died in 1880 and is buried at Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland,

but a number of his ancestors, including his son, James R., are

buried here.

James R. helped establish Mentor’s first public library and

served as the first president of the Mentor Village Library Board.

His brother, Abram, was an architect and donated the plans and

specifications for the first library, now located on the corner of

Center Street and Nowlen Avenue. Abram also designed the John

G. Oliver summer home on Little Mountain Road, known today as

Wildwood Cultural Center.

The grand-daughter-in-law of the President, Eleanor Borton

Garfield, became Mentor’s first woman mayor in 1952. She is best

remembered for helping to establish the first public park, later re-

named in her honor. She is buried in Mentor Cemetery alongside

her husband, Rudolph Hill and their infant daughter.

Section 14

- YAXLEY

Mentor Village hired its first full-time law enforcement officer

in July of 1926. Deputy Marshall Lawrence R. Yaxley was 21

years old when he was issued a blue uniform and badge number

One. But his career was short-lived. In January, 1927, while trying

to cover an open manhole on Mentor Avenue at Garfield Road,

Yaxley’s service revolver fell from his holster into the sewer. As it

hit the bottom, the weapon fired into the air hitting Yaxley in the

left temple. He died a short time later. Lawrence R. Yaxley’s name

is listed on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in

Washington, D.C.

Section 14

- WYANT

Melvin E. Wyant, Sr. became an accredited rose judge and

lecturer and for more than 50 years was a commercial grower.

In 1925, hearing that Mentor was good for growing roses, he

purchased 10 acres on a dirt road named Johnnycake Ridge (west

of King Memorial Road) . He held patents for more than 30

varieties and his display garden consisted of 2,000 roses on more

than 50 acres. Visitors from around the world came to see the man

known as “the rose specialist.” He was best known for developing

varieties of hybrid tea roses, including, Ardelle, Alabaster, Mentor,

Gold Glow, Masked Ball and Mr. Tall.

Section 4

- SAWYER

Joseph Sawyer established the first grist mill in Mentor

in 1810, using water power from Marsh Creek. He continued

purchasing property, eventually owning over 1,100 acres. In 1820,

he hired the prominent architect, Jonathan Goldsmith to build him

a home on Mentor Avenue.

The Sawyers later became nurserymen and owned property

along Mentor Avenue, from Old Johnnycake past Chillicothe Road.

Daniel, Isaac and Almon Sawyer all owned homes in this area;

some are still standing, including Daniel’s home, built in 1843,

which is perhaps one of the most notable. In 1923, it became the

headquarters of Wayside Garden; today it is known as The Sawyer

House Restaurant and Tavern.

Section 2

- CORNING

Colonel Warren Corning came to Mentor in 1810 and

purchased as much as a square mile of real estate from Center

Street west along Mentor Avenue. Corning donated land for the

first school and the first church. When he retired in 1830, the

remainder of his property went to his children and he and his wife

Elizabeth moved in with their son, Nathan. (The Corning-White

House.)

Nathan became famous in his own right, by organizing a

petition to form a government separate from Mentor Township. He

became the first Mayor of Mentor Village in 1855.

Warren Corning’s youngest daughter, Harriet married James

Dickey, but he died a short time later. Harriet then sold some of her

property, then known as The Dickey Farm, to James A. Garfield in

1876. What was originally built as a two-room cabin, would later

gain national prominence as Lawnfield, the home of the President.

Section 1

- MUNSON

Ashbel Munson came to Mentor from Connecticut in 1820,

and bought 200 acres on Jackson Street for $6 an acre. His c. 1865

house, still stands on the northwest corner of Jackson and Heisley

.

It was covered with stone in 1928.

H.N. (Horatio) Munson was

a prominent resident who served

as County Surveyor for 28 years.

He and his wife, Elizabeth were

close friends of President Garfield.

Elizabeth was instrumental in the

Township purchasing Hopkins Point

at the turn of the century from Anna

Hopkins. A pavilion and bath houses

were constructed and the popular property became known as

Township Park.

Harry Munson was a farmer, a judge, a Representative to

Congress, a justice of the peace, and a captain of the militia.

Members of the Munson family lived in his house at 7050 Jackson

Street from 1844 until 1963.

Sections 1 and 9

- PARKER — Mentor’s

first family

Clark was the younger brother of our first settler, Charles

Parker, who came to the region with Moses Cleaveland’s surveying

team in 1796 and 1797. Both Charles and Clark had worked as

surveyors and ran the first survey lines in the Western Reserve.

Charles is credited with having built the first cabin in the Marsh

in 1797; he was soon joined by his 16-year-old brother Clark.

While the adventurous Charles left in 1811 to continue developing

wilderness areas (he helped settle Milan), Clark opted to remain

in Mentor until his death in 1847. He was known as a Christian

and a Patriot, served as one of three directors of the first school,

helped to establish Mentor Methodist Church and donated land on

which it was built, and later served as Mentor Postmaster. During

the War of 1812, Clark was a Captain in the Ohio Militia. In 1805,

he married Margaret Jordan, a daughter of Concord’s first settler

and together they operated The Old Homestead, a 20 acre farm on

the south side of Mentor Avenue (south of Burridge). The couple

raised 13 children, many of whom remained in Mentor to raise

their own families.

One son, Benjamin Franklin Parker, also led an active public

life and served as Mentor Postmaster. By 1915, the Parker

property had been reduced to six acres and Clark’s grandson,

named Colonel, resided there. Like his ancestors before him, he

was extremely active in his

community serving as a

Mentor Township Trustee and

a member of the Board of

the Lake County Agricultural

Society. Colonel Parker was

instrumental in developing

the grounds and buildings

constructed at the Lake

County Fairgrounds. Parker Drive, located just southwest of Little

Mountain Road, and encompassing part of the Old Homestead, is

named for the Parker’s.

Honoring Our Veterans

In 1872, a group began plans to erect a Soldiers Monument to honor

those who had lost their lives in battle. That year on Declaration Day,

the men and women of Mentor placed 27 floral bouquets on the graves

of a Revolutionary War soldier, 14 soldiers from the

War of 1812 and

12 Civil Wa

r soldi

ers. On

September

4,

the 28-foot Soldiers Monument,

featuring the State Coat of Arms was dedicated in front of an immense

crowd led by the 29

th

Regiment, Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. This

public monument cost $2,000 to construct. An article in the

Painesville

Telegraph stated

, “it is an enduring memento of the patriotism of the

noble hearted men and women of Mentor, showing how truly they

appreciate love of country, how gladly they honor the patriot and soldier.

Mentor may well feel proud in being the pioneer town in Lake County

, in

honoring her soldiers by the erection of a monument. “

Seventy-eight years later, the names on the Civil War Monument

were illegible. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Daniels climbed the monument to

record the names which were later cast in two aluminum plaques and

attached to the east and west sides of the monument.

Around the same time, a bronze plaque was placed on the south side

of the monument honoring those who lost their lives while serving in

World War II.

In 1954, the American Legion Post 352 erected a 60-foot flagpole to

honor veterans of all wars. The flagpole replaced a World War I Honor

Roll that had become deteriorated.

In the 1980s, Richard “Doc’” Leyden became the driving force

behind a monument to honor those who died during the Vietnam

War. The new monument was designed to complement the Flagpole.

The American Legion Post 352 raised $4,000 to erect a 10-foot high

triangular memorial bearing the name of 14 Mentor residents who died

during the Vietnam War. On the face of the memorial are the words,

“To All Who Served.” In 1985, Amvets Auxiliary Post No. 40 raised

the funds to install permanent ground lighting for the monument and

flagpole.

Over the years, there have been many ceremonies paying tribute to

Mentor’s war veterans. Declaration Day was renamed Memorial Day

and is celebrated each year with a parade and a gathering at Mentor

Cemetery. The speakers and messages have varied, but the conclusion at

each ceremony remains the same … a salute by the firing squad and the

playing of “Taps.”

Gravestone Symbolism

During the mid 19th century, carvings on headstones were

used to convey themes that emphasized eternity, rebirth, and the

experience of the deceased. As you wander through this, or any

other old cemetery, pay particular attention to the designs carved

on the gravestones, as each has a special meaning. Learning the

meanings behind the myriad symbols will give you new insight

into the lives led by those buried in a cemetery. Broken columns,

inverted torches, and urns represented lives that ended too soon.

An hourglass with wings represents the fleeting passage of time.

The weeping willow tree was used in the Victorian era to mean

mourning and the idea that man, like a tree, must reach for heaven.

Included here is a short list of gravestone carvings and their

symbolic meanings.

Column

Mortality. A draped or broken column

represents the break in earthly to heavenly

life. It can also mean the loss of the head of a

family.

Drapery

Mourning. An urn that is completely covered

with a drape symbolizes a full life.

A

Rose

in

Full

Bloom

In the prime of life.

Daisy

Symbolizes innocence; usually found

on graves of young children.

Lamb

Represents innocence. Often seen on

children’s gravestones.

Lyre

A lyre with a broken string symbolizes the end of life. Often found

on the graves of musicians.

Private and Abandoned Cemeteries

Blish Road Cemetery

There was a cemetery on the east side of Blish Road (now King

Memorial) that served residents around Little Mountain. When

the farm was sold, burials of Little Mountain residents were made

in Mentor Cemetery. John Reynolds, survivor of Valley Forge, is

still buried there. The plat map for this cemetery is the first one in

the Cemetery Book in the Lake County Archives, located in the

basement of the Lake County Administration Building, Painesville.

Records indicate the cemetery held Rosetta Norton, John

Reynolds, Mary and Polly Reynolds, Matthew Green, H. Johnson,

Jane Ann Johnson, Roswell Randolph Hubbard, Helen Clarina

Hubbard, Tamma Fox, George Fox, O. Matthews, Louisa Demerill,

William and Mary Hendryx, Mariah Ruth Foster, L. F. Gaylord and

Rey (last name illegible).

Burridge Farm Cemetery

There is little evidence of this cemetery’s existence. It is

assumed it was located in the area of Burridge Road, but more

likely it was located further east near Hopkins Road.

According to a newspaper article, the first white person buried

in Old Mentor was in the Mentor Pioneer Cemetery in 1811 (at

Center Street Village School). This was Jesse Phelps. However,

in a manuscript about David Abbot by Simeon C. Hickok, written

between 1878 and 1901 ((The Historical Society Quarterly, May

1962) a different story states that, “Jesse Phelps, then living in the

Village of Painesville, subsequently owned, lived and died and

was buried on the farm now owned by Eleazer Burridge in Mentor.

Some years later it was called the Phelps lot.”

According to the 1874 landowner map, Eleazer Burridge owned

281 acres on Mentor Avenue with Hopkins Road running through

the center. Burridge also owned another 30+ acres further west,

probably where Burridge Road is located. The Phelps Lot was

owned by Amassa Cobb in 1840. Amassa and his wife built the

house on the 100-acre property. His deed included a small block

as burial ground and right of way for the heirs. The property

later became the Burridge farm. (The Cobb Burridge house was

moved around the corner to Hopkins Road and became the Mentor

Schools Administration Building.) The unanswered question is

whether Jesse Phelps was buried in the Mentor Pioneer Cemetery

or the Burridge Farm Cemetery.

Carpenter Farm Cemetery

The Carpenter Farm Cemetery appears on the 1857 and 1874

landowner maps, and was in the area of the Great Lakes Mall’s east

entranceway. According to the Village Council records of 1901, it

was voted to remove the bodies from the burial ground of the L.H.

Carpenter Cemetery. The bodies were to be moved by descendants

of the dead, to other cemeteries. Notices were to be posted causing

one to think this may have been more than just a small family

cemetery. Benjamin and L.H. were moved to Mentor Cemetery.

Benjamin can be found in Section 8B, and L. H. is in Section 10.

Daniels Farm Cemetery

This cemetery appears on the 1874 landowner map as a long

narrow strip on the northeast corner of the John Daniels property

. It

is said to be where the Mentor Mobile Green Estates stands today

.

Family members have tried to locate this cemetery to no avail. This

is private property with no public access.

Those who were buried on the Daniels farm were: Aaron

Daniels, Phoebe (Harmon) Daniels and Anna (Bassett) Daniels.

Phoebe & Anna are thought to have been wives of Aaron. Geauga

Co. marriages list Aaron married Anna 1-28-1817. These three

remains were reinterred in November 1925 in Mentor Cemetery.

Also buried on the farm were an Indian who worked on the farm,

and Revolutionary War Soldier Christopher Colson. According

to Soldiers and Widows of the American Revolution who lived in

Lake County, Ohio by Mildred Steed, Christopher Colson “was

buried on the Daniel’s farm just east of Willoughby, later removed

to the Willoughby Cemetery, Lot 358, Grave 5.”

Mentor Pioneer Cemetery

This now extinct burying ground was at the present site of the

original Center Street Village School at Center Street and Mentor

Avenue. In 1832, the property was deeded to the Village of Mentor

School District, No. 2 by Warren Corning and Moses Kerr.

According to Soldiers and Widows of the American Revolution

who lived in Lake County, Ohio by Mildred Hoyes Steed, 1985

page 30 and 91, two Revolutionary War Veterans were buried in

the Old Mentor Cemetery. The headstones of Garrit Brass (1837)

and Israel Fox (1832) were moved to the Mentor Cemetery, section

8A, and have since been replaced. Fox is in Lot 63, Grave 2, right

next to Brass, denoted as Row 13, stones 3 and 4.

Mentor Headlands Cemetery

This quaint and secluded little spot is behind the Jayne property

in the Headlands, 300 yards from Headlands and Jordan Roads.

From the

Painesville Telegraph

, Issue 20: “Mrs. Martha Hazelton

(sic) died May 1, 1863 in Mentor at the residence of Capt. R. H.

Fountain. She was 80 yrs. old.”

The headstones for Martha Hazeltine and her two children are

broken and in poor condition. These are the inscriptions:

Martha/ wife of/ Wm. Hazeltine/ Died/ May 1, 1863/

In the 80th year/ of her age/

Her pilgrimage is over without a sigh./

Passed she over death’s river to the sky.

Frances C./ Lorran S./ Died Jan. 22, 1855/

aged 1 yr. and 3 mo./ children of W. and Mary Hazeltine

Mentor Lagoons Cemetery (Brooks Farm)

Located on the Mentor Lagoons Nature Preserve property, this

very small cemetery has been “discovered” several times in the

past century. Most recently, after Mentor purchased the property, it

installed a wrought iron fence around the stones to protect them. It

is believed that the remains were removed to the Mentor Municipal

Cemetery. The monument at Mentor Municipal Cemetery reads in

part,

H. M. Brooks/ died/ April 11, 1883/ aged 74 years/

Mary his wife/ died March 10, 1841/ aged 29 years/ Mary his

wife/ born Jan. 5, 1820/ died Mar. 17, 1890/ Brooks.”

Although there is a small headstone for the second wife, Mary,

there is none for the first Mary, leading some to believe her grave

is still at the Lagoons.

North Mentor Cemetery

This small cemetery, laid out about 1854, is on the south side

of Lake Shore Boulevard, in front of the North Mentor Centenary

United Methodist Church. It is not church related. This burying

ground has four prominent marble stones. Thomas and Catherine

(Megley) Lapham are buried here and are also mentioned on

the family monument at the Mentor Municipal Cemetery. This

cemetery was also open to neighbors with permission. Other

burials include David P. Guthrie and Melissa J. Roff.

Wheeler

Farm

Cemetery

This extinct family cemetery is said to have been on the north

side of Lake Shore Boulevard about 1/4 mile east of Rt. 306, but

west of Eckley’s Corners. According to Grace Lapham who was

97 when interviewed in 1999, her great grandparents, Mary and

Seymour Wheeler were buried “on the plains” on an old farm.

The head stones were buried. When it was developed, the stones

were dug up and broken. They were moved to Mentor Municipal

Cemetery. These old marble stones have recently been repaired and

set in a granite frame. They are badly cracked, but lovely. They are

in section 2B. Seymour died in 1844 and Mary in 1848. It is likely

that their granddaughter Mary was also buried in this cemetery and

her stone moved to Mentor Municipal Cemetery.

Our thanks to the Lake County Genealogical Society for

providing historical information on Private and Abandoned

Cemeteries and to Beth Santore, Webmaster of

http://www.graveaddiction.com for information

on carvings and symbolism.

Cemetery Decoration Rules
 
The following rules and regulations were developed with the
assistance of a citizen’s advisory group to protect and preserve
the decorum and solmnity of the cemetery. Your cooperation in
observing the rules is appreciated.
Fresh or artificial flowers should be placed in urns, pots, or
flower holders and placed alongside the monument on patio blocks
or the footer extension.
Steel rod hangers are permitted. Single hangers shall be placed
at the side of the monument. Double hangers must be placed flush
along the back of the monument footer. The basket or hook shall
not hang over into the walkway.
All hangers must have a visible
decoration on the hook at all times for the safety of those walking
by the hanger
. Wrapped or decorated steel rod hangers are not
permitted.
No more than one steel rod hanger is permitted at a monument.
Wreaths can be placed at the side of the headstone during the
winter months.
Non-glass eternal flames containing a candle or solar powered
candle, or a solar powered “coach” style lantern may be placed at
the gravesite. The eternal flame should be placed at the side of
the monument. The solar light shall be displayed from a steel rod
hanger.
The following decorations are not permitted:
 
Glass products or gazing balls; styrofoam; wind chimes, wind
socks, balloons, inflatable decorations, or pinwheels; wood chips,
stones, bricks, etc. in front of or behind the headstones; Wires
or stakes of any kind to anchor decorations; birdhouses or bird
feeders; banners and banner hangers; wrapped decorated steel rod
hangers.
Decoration Placement
 
Decoration not on the monument must be fully placed on either
patio blocks or footer extensions to permit maintenance and funeral

access. Patio blocks must not be any wider than
 
the monument
footer, nor extend beyond the gravesite. Footer extensions may be
constructed only by the City of Mentor cemetery staff.
 
All decorations must be placed at the monument.
 
It is recommended that
all
decorations be clearly marked with
the section, lot, grave, and name on the base.
 
Artificial flowers that appear unkempt, and fresh flowers that
have died, will be removed by cemetery staff.
 
You are permitted to decorate your gravesite only.
 
To make special arrangements for decoration placement for
special days, such as birthdays or anniversary of death, contact the
Mentor Cemetery office at (440) 974-5733.
Funeral Flowers and Decorations
 
Decorations and flowers at the time of burial are left on the
grave for three days. Decorations are then removed.
Complete Decoration Removals
 
Gravesites are to be cleaned of all decorations three times a
year. These dates will be posted on the exit signs
 
March 1
st
 
Three weeks after Easter
 
November 1
st
 
Please allow two weeks to be sure removal has been completed
before placing new decorations on your gravesite. This will protect
your new decorations from being accidentally removed. Items in
an urn or on a monument will not be removed,
unless
they pertain
to a past holiday, or they are deemed unkempt.
 
Major holiday decorations such as Memorial Day, Independence
Day, Labor Day, or Halloween, etc. should be removed 14 days
after the holiday.
Wooden Crosses
 
Wooden crosses are permitted to mark the location of grave-
sites under the following circumstances only:
a.
 
Until a permanent monument is placed on the site. After the
placement of the monument, the cross will be removed and
taken to the Cemetery Office.

b.
 
To mark any monument under 18 inches tall from
November 1
st
to March 1
st
.
 
All crosses shall be constructed of wood and marked with a last
name and the section, lot, and grave. The cross shall not exceed 36
inches above ground. The cross member shall not exceed 18 inches
in width. The cross shall be constructed with 1” x 4” wood only.
Crosses not conforming to these dimensions shall be removed.
Other Cemetery Rules
 
Speed limit is 15 mph. Please be courteous to pedestrians.
 
The cemetery closes at dark.
 
No pets are permitted within the cemetery property.
 
Recreational activities are not permitted on the cemetery
grounds, such as Frisbee, baseball, golf, skating, skateboarding,
jogging, or picnicking.
 
The placement of any signs or notices, or soliciting the sale of
any item is not permitted.
 
No loud music.
 
The City of Mentor will not be responsible for any broken or
stolen items and reserves the right to remove any articles not in
keeping with the beautification of the cemetery or impeding the
maintenance of the grounds.
 
The City of Mentor reserves the right to review, revise, add, or
delete rules as necessary. An item not addressed in the rules will be
considered not permitted.
If
 
you
 
have
 
any
 
questions,
 
please
 
call
 
the
 
Cemetery
 
Office
 
at
 
(440)
 
974-5733.

 
In 1854, a meeting was held at the Mentor Special District
Schoolhouse on Hopkins Road to organize a Cemetery
Association. Members included
residents Thomas Clapp, James
Dickey, Nathan Corning, Robert
Murray II, Stephen Hart, Edward
M. Ingersoll, Martin Sawyer, Sellick
Warren, Schuyler S. Baker, David
Hopkins and Erastus Parmelee. The
Association purchased ten acres
of land “situated in the Jackson lot
and lying on the road from Amasa
Cobb’s corners to David Hopkins’ corners for the consideration
of $400 to be paid in four equal annual installments from the 8
th
 
day of April 1854 with interest.” The records were recorded on
December 15, 1854.
 
Amasa Cobb, died on March 16, 1855, and was the first to be
buried in Mentor Cemetery.
 
Mentor’s original burial site was located on property deeded to
the schools and located at the intersection of Mentor Avenue and
Center Street. In 1858 and 1859, William S. Kerr, the Treasurer of
the Village School Board, was instructed to pay residents for lots
they owned on this property. The plan was to move the burying
grounds to the new Mentor Cemetery, which allowed the School
Board to build a two-story brick schoolhouse on the site of the
former burying grounds.
 
 
In 1876, in a peach orchard just south of the cemetery a new
Special District School was built. It operated until 1937 and later
served as the first Mentor Police Station. After the building was
removed, the property became part of the Mentor Cemetery.
 
Today, the Mentor Municipal Cemetery consists of 60 acres,
with approximately 39 acres in use. To learn more about the history
of the Mentor Cemetery, pick up a copy of “Mentor: The First 200
Years.” It is available from the Mentor Recreation Office and local
book stores.
History of Mentor Cemetery

Self-Guided Field Trip
 
Since the Mentor Cemetery was founded in 1854 the names of
Reynolds, Munson, Sawyer, Parker, and Garfield have all become
familiar street names in Mentor. But these names also represent
prominent residents whose lives had a profound impact on the
formation of our town. Take this self-guided field trip of this
historic cemetery. We begin with our most prominent family.
Section 15
- GARFIELD
 
President James A. Garfield became a resident of Mentor
in 1876, when he bought an old farm just west of the center of
town. Large additions were built around the 40-year-old, nine-
room-house in order to accommodate the Congressman, his wife
Lucretia, their five children and the President’s mother. Garfield
died in 1880 and is buried at Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland,
but a number of his ancestors, including his son, James R., are
buried here.
 
James R. helped establish Mentor’s first public library and
served as the first president of the Mentor Village Library Board.
His brother, Abram, was an architect and donated the plans and
specifications for the first library, now located on the corner of
Center Street and Nowlen Avenue. Abram also designed the John
G. Oliver summer home on Little Mountain Road, known today as
Wildwood Cultural Center.
 
The grand-daughter-in-law of the President, Eleanor Borton
Garfield, became Mentor’s first woman mayor in 1952. She is best
remembered for helping to establish the first public park, later re-
named in her honor. She is buried in Mentor Cemetery alongside
her husband, Rudolph Hill and their infant daughter.
Section 14
- YAXLEY
 
Mentor Village hired its first full-time law enforcement officer
in July of 1926. Deputy Marshall Lawrence R. Yaxley was 21
years old when he was issued a blue uniform and badge number
One. But his career was short-lived. In January, 1927, while trying
to cover an open manhole on Mentor Avenue at Garfield Road,

Yaxley’s service revolver fell from his holster into the sewer. As it
hit the bottom, the weapon fired into the air hitting Yaxley in the
left temple. He died a short time later. Lawrence R. Yaxley’s name
is listed on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in
Washington, D.C.
Section 14
- WYANT
 
Melvin E. Wyant, Sr. became an accredited rose judge and
lecturer and for more than 50 years was a commercial grower.
In 1925, hearing that Mentor was good for growing roses, he
purchased 10 acres on a dirt road named Johnnycake Ridge (west
of King Memorial Road) . He held patents for more than 30
varieties and his display garden consisted of 2,000 roses on more
than 50 acres. Visitors from around the world came to see the man
known as “the rose specialist.” He was best known for developing
varieties of hybrid tea roses, including, Ardelle, Alabaster, Mentor,
Gold Glow, Masked Ball and Mr. Tall.
Section 4
- SAWYER
 
Joseph Sawyer established the first grist mill in Mentor
in 1810, using water power from Marsh Creek. He continued
purchasing property, eventually owning over 1,100 acres. In 1820,
he hired the prominent architect, Jonathan Goldsmith to build him
a home on Mentor Avenue.
 
The Sawyers later became nurserymen and owned property
along Mentor Avenue, from Old Johnnycake past Chillicothe Road.
Daniel, Isaac and Almon Sawyer all owned homes in this area;
some are still standing, including Daniel’s home, built in 1843,
which is perhaps one of the most notable. In 1923, it became the
headquarters of Wayside Garden; today it is known as The Sawyer
House Restaurant and Tavern.
Section 2
- CORNING
 
Colonel Warren Corning came to Mentor in 1810 and
purchased as much as a square mile of real estate from Center
Street west along Mentor Avenue. Corning donated land for the
first school and the first church. When he retired in 1830, the

remainder of his property went to his children and he and his wife
Elizabeth moved in with their son, Nathan. (The Corning-White
House.)
 
Nathan became famous in his own right, by organizing a
petition to form a government separate from Mentor Township. He
became the first Mayor of Mentor Village in 1855.
 
Warren Corning’s youngest daughter, Harriet married James
Dickey, but he died a short time later. Harriet then sold some of her
property, then known as The Dickey Farm, to James A. Garfield in
1876. What was originally built as a two-room cabin, would later
gain national prominence as Lawnfield, the home of the President.
Section 1
- MUNSON
 
Ashbel Munson came to Mentor from Connecticut in 1820,
and bought 200 acres on Jackson Street for $6 an acre. His c. 1865
house, still stands on the northwest corner of Jackson and Heisley
.
It was covered with stone in 1928.
 
H.N. (Horatio) Munson was
a prominent resident who served
as County Surveyor for 28 years.
He and his wife, Elizabeth were
close friends of President Garfield.
Elizabeth was instrumental in the
Township purchasing Hopkins Point
at the turn of the century from Anna
Hopkins. A pavilion and bath houses
were constructed and the popular property became known as
Township Park.
 
Harry Munson was a farmer, a judge, a Representative to
Congress, a justice of the peace, and a captain of the militia.
Members of the Munson family lived in his house at 7050 Jackson
Street from 1844 until 1963.
Sections 1 and 9
- PARKER — Mentor’s
first family
 
Clark was the younger brother of our first settler, Charles
Parker, who came to the region with Moses Cleaveland’s surveying

team in 1796 and 1797. Both Charles and Clark had worked as
surveyors and ran the first survey lines in the Western Reserve.
Charles is credited with having built the first cabin in the Marsh
in 1797; he was soon joined by his 16-year-old brother Clark.
While the adventurous Charles left in 1811 to continue developing
wilderness areas (he helped settle Milan), Clark opted to remain
in Mentor until his death in 1847. He was known as a Christian
and a Patriot, served as one of three directors of the first school,
helped to establish Mentor Methodist Church and donated land on
which it was built, and later served as Mentor Postmaster. During
the War of 1812, Clark was a Captain in the Ohio Militia. In 1805,
he married Margaret Jordan, a daughter of Concord’s first settler
and together they operated The Old Homestead, a 20 acre farm on
the south side of Mentor Avenue (south of Burridge). The couple
raised 13 children, many of whom remained in Mentor to raise
their own families.
 
One son, Benjamin Franklin Parker, also led an active public
life and served as Mentor Postmaster. By 1915, the Parker
property had been reduced to six acres and Clark’s grandson,
named Colonel, resided there. Like his ancestors before him, he
was extremely active in his
community serving as a
Mentor Township Trustee and
a member of the Board of
the Lake County Agricultural
Society. Colonel Parker was
instrumental in developing
the grounds and buildings
constructed at the Lake
County Fairgrounds. Parker Drive, located just southwest of Little
Mountain Road, and encompassing part of the Old Homestead, is
named for the Parker’s.

Honoring Our Veterans
 
In 1872, a group began plans to erect a Soldiers Monument to honor
those who had lost their lives in battle. That year on Declaration Day,
the men and women of Mentor placed 27 floral bouquets on the graves
of a Revolutionary War soldier, 14 soldiers from the
War of 1812 and
12 Civil Wa
r soldi
ers. On
September
4,
the 28-foot Soldiers Monument,
featuring the State Coat of Arms was dedicated in front of an immense
crowd led by the 29
th
Regiment, Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. This
public monument cost $2,000 to construct. An article in the
Painesville
Telegraph stated
, “it is an enduring memento of the patriotism of the
noble hearted men and women of Mentor, showing how truly they
appreciate love of country, how gladly they honor the patriot and soldier.
Mentor may well feel proud in being the pioneer town in Lake County
, in
honoring her soldiers by the erection of a monument. “
 
Seventy-eight years later, the names on the Civil War Monument
were illegible. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Daniels climbed the monument to
record the names which were later cast in two aluminum plaques and
attached to the east and west sides of the monument.
 
Around the same time, a bronze plaque was placed on the south side
of the monument honoring those who lost their lives while serving in
World War II.
 
In 1954, the American Legion Post 352 erected a 60-foot flagpole to
honor veterans of all wars. The flagpole replaced a World War I Honor
Roll that had become deteriorated.
 
In the 1980s, Richard “Doc’” Leyden became the driving force
behind a monument to honor those who died during the Vietnam
War. The new monument was designed to complement the Flagpole.
The American Legion Post 352 raised $4,000 to erect a 10-foot high
triangular memorial bearing the name of 14 Mentor residents who died
during the Vietnam War. On the face of the memorial are the words,
“To All Who Served.” In 1985, Amvets Auxiliary Post No. 40 raised
the funds to install permanent ground lighting for the monument and
flagpole.
 
Over the years, there have been many ceremonies paying tribute to
Mentor’s war veterans. Declaration Day was renamed Memorial Day
and is celebrated each year with a parade and a gathering at Mentor
Cemetery. The speakers and messages have varied, but the conclusion at
each ceremony remains the same … a salute by the firing squad and the
playing of “Taps.”

Gravestone Symbolism
 
During the mid 19th century, carvings on headstones were
used to convey themes that emphasized eternity, rebirth, and the
experience of the deceased. As you wander through this, or any
other old cemetery, pay particular attention to the designs carved
on the gravestones, as each has a special meaning. Learning the
meanings behind the myriad symbols will give you new insight
into the lives led by those buried in a cemetery. Broken columns,
inverted torches, and urns represented lives that ended too soon.
An hourglass with wings represents the fleeting passage of time.
The weeping willow tree was used in the Victorian era to mean
mourning and the idea that man, like a tree, must reach for heaven.
Included here is a short list of gravestone carvings and their
symbolic meanings.
Column
Mortality. A draped or broken column
represents the break in earthly to heavenly
life. It can also mean the loss of the head of a
family.
Drapery
Mourning. An urn that is completely covered
with a drape symbolizes a full life.
A
 
Rose
 
in
 
Full
 
Bloom
In the prime of life.
Daisy
Symbolizes innocence; usually found
on graves of young children.
Lamb
Represents innocence. Often seen on
children’s gravestones.
Lyre
A lyre with a broken string symbolizes the end of life. Often found
on the graves of musicians.

Private and Abandoned Cemeteries
Blish Road Cemetery
There was a cemetery on the east side of Blish Road (now King
Memorial) that served residents around Little Mountain. When
the farm was sold, burials of Little Mountain residents were made
in Mentor Cemetery. John Reynolds, survivor of Valley Forge, is
still buried there. The plat map for this cemetery is the first one in
the Cemetery Book in the Lake County Archives, located in the
basement of the Lake County Administration Building, Painesville.
Records indicate the cemetery held Rosetta Norton, John
Reynolds, Mary and Polly Reynolds, Matthew Green, H. Johnson,
Jane Ann Johnson, Roswell Randolph Hubbard, Helen Clarina
Hubbard, Tamma Fox, George Fox, O. Matthews, Louisa Demerill,
William and Mary Hendryx, Mariah Ruth Foster, L. F. Gaylord and
Rey (last name illegible).
Burridge Farm Cemetery
There is little evidence of this cemetery’s existence. It is
assumed it was located in the area of Burridge Road, but more
likely it was located further east near Hopkins Road.
 
According to a newspaper article, the first white person buried
in Old Mentor was in the Mentor Pioneer Cemetery in 1811 (at
Center Street Village School). This was Jesse Phelps. However,
in a manuscript about David Abbot by Simeon C. Hickok, written
between 1878 and 1901 ((The Historical Society Quarterly, May
1962) a different story states that, “Jesse Phelps, then living in the
Village of Painesville, subsequently owned, lived and died and
was buried on the farm now owned by Eleazer Burridge in Mentor.
Some years later it was called the Phelps lot.”
According to the 1874 landowner map, Eleazer Burridge owned
281 acres on Mentor Avenue with Hopkins Road running through
the center. Burridge also owned another 30+ acres further west,
probably where Burridge Road is located. The Phelps Lot was
owned by Amassa Cobb in 1840. Amassa and his wife built the
house on the 100-acre property. His deed included a small block
as burial ground and right of way for the heirs. The property

later became the Burridge farm. (The Cobb Burridge house was
moved around the corner to Hopkins Road and became the Mentor
Schools Administration Building.) The unanswered question is
whether Jesse Phelps was buried in the Mentor Pioneer Cemetery
or the Burridge Farm Cemetery.
Carpenter Farm Cemetery
The Carpenter Farm Cemetery appears on the 1857 and 1874
landowner maps, and was in the area of the Great Lakes Mall’s east
entranceway. According to the Village Council records of 1901, it
was voted to remove the bodies from the burial ground of the L.H.
Carpenter Cemetery. The bodies were to be moved by descendants
of the dead, to other cemeteries. Notices were to be posted causing
one to think this may have been more than just a small family
cemetery. Benjamin and L.H. were moved to Mentor Cemetery.
Benjamin can be found in Section 8B, and L. H. is in Section 10.
Daniels Farm Cemetery
This cemetery appears on the 1874 landowner map as a long
narrow strip on the northeast corner of the John Daniels property
. It
is said to be where the Mentor Mobile Green Estates stands today
.
Family members have tried to locate this cemetery to no avail. This
is private property with no public access.
Those who were buried on the Daniels farm were: Aaron
Daniels, Phoebe (Harmon) Daniels and Anna (Bassett) Daniels.
Phoebe & Anna are thought to have been wives of Aaron. Geauga
Co. marriages list Aaron married Anna 1-28-1817. These three
remains were reinterred in November 1925 in Mentor Cemetery.
Also buried on the farm were an Indian who worked on the farm,
and Revolutionary War Soldier Christopher Colson. According
to Soldiers and Widows of the American Revolution who lived in
Lake County, Ohio by Mildred Steed, Christopher Colson “was
buried on the Daniel’s farm just east of Willoughby, later removed
to the Willoughby Cemetery, Lot 358, Grave 5.”
Mentor Pioneer Cemetery
This now extinct burying ground was at the present site of the
original Center Street Village School at Center Street and Mentor

Avenue. In 1832, the property was deeded to the Village of Mentor
School District, No. 2 by Warren Corning and Moses Kerr.
According to Soldiers and Widows of the American Revolution
who lived in Lake County, Ohio by Mildred Hoyes Steed, 1985
page 30 and 91, two Revolutionary War Veterans were buried in
the Old Mentor Cemetery. The headstones of Garrit Brass (1837)
and Israel Fox (1832) were moved to the Mentor Cemetery, section
8A, and have since been replaced. Fox is in Lot 63, Grave 2, right
next to Brass, denoted as Row 13, stones 3 and 4.
Mentor Headlands Cemetery
This quaint and secluded little spot is behind the Jayne property
in the Headlands, 300 yards from Headlands and Jordan Roads.
From the
Painesville Telegraph
, Issue 20: “Mrs. Martha Hazelton
(sic) died May 1, 1863 in Mentor at the residence of Capt. R. H.
Fountain. She was 80 yrs. old.”
 
The headstones for Martha Hazeltine and her two children are
broken and in poor condition. These are the inscriptions:
 
Martha/ wife of/ Wm. Hazeltine/ Died/ May 1, 1863/
 
In the 80th year/ of her age/
 
Her pilgrimage is over without a sigh./
 
Passed she over death’s river to the sky.
 
Frances C./ Lorran S./ Died Jan. 22, 1855/
 
aged 1 yr. and 3 mo./ children of W. and Mary Hazeltine
Mentor Lagoons Cemetery (Brooks Farm)
Located on the Mentor Lagoons Nature Preserve property, this
very small cemetery has been “discovered” several times in the
past century. Most recently, after Mentor purchased the property, it
installed a wrought iron fence around the stones to protect them. It
is believed that the remains were removed to the Mentor Municipal
Cemetery. The monument at Mentor Municipal Cemetery reads in
part,
 
H. M. Brooks/ died/ April 11, 1883/ aged 74 years/
 
Mary his wife/ died March 10, 1841/ aged 29 years/ Mary his
wife/ born Jan. 5, 1820/ died Mar. 17, 1890/ Brooks.”

Although there is a small headstone for the second wife, Mary,
there is none for the first Mary, leading some to believe her grave
is still at the Lagoons.
North Mentor Cemetery
This small cemetery, laid out about 1854, is on the south side
of Lake Shore Boulevard, in front of the North Mentor Centenary
United Methodist Church. It is not church related. This burying
ground has four prominent marble stones. Thomas and Catherine
(Megley) Lapham are buried here and are also mentioned on
the family monument at the Mentor Municipal Cemetery. This
cemetery was also open to neighbors with permission. Other
burials include David P. Guthrie and Melissa J. Roff.
Wheeler
 
Farm
 
Cemetery
This extinct family cemetery is said to have been on the north
side of Lake Shore Boulevard about 1/4 mile east of Rt. 306, but
west of Eckley’s Corners. According to Grace Lapham who was
97 when interviewed in 1999, her great grandparents, Mary and
Seymour Wheeler were buried “on the plains” on an old farm.
The head stones were buried. When it was developed, the stones
were dug up and broken. They were moved to Mentor Municipal
Cemetery. These old marble stones have recently been repaired and
set in a granite frame. They are badly cracked, but lovely. They are
in section 2B. Seymour died in 1844 and Mary in 1848. It is likely
that their granddaughter Mary was also buried in this cemetery and
her stone moved to Mentor Municipal Cemetery.
 
Our thanks to the Lake County Genealogical Society for
providing historical information on Private and Abandoned
Cemeteries and to Beth Santore, Webmaster of
on carvings and symbolism.
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Monuments, Memorials, Headstones, Cemetery Markers, Tombstones Companies Twinsburg Ohio

Twinsburg, Ohio families have many cemetery choices on where to bury their loved ones. One item to consider when making a cemetery decision are the grave memorial, headstone and grave marker regulations it stipulates. Each cemetery has many requirements including size, color and material.

Classic Memorials has deep knowledge of each cemetery’s regulations and more than four generations of experience helping families choose the right memorial or monuments for their loved one. If you have any questions regarding specificTwinsburg, Ohio cemetery guidelines and regulations, you can contact us here:

Classic Memorials, Inc.

www.classicmemorialsinc.com

13882 Cedar Rd.

Cleveland, OH 44118

Phone Number: (216) 321-6740

Toll-Free: (800) 278-8523

Crown Hill Cemetery Info:

8592 Darrow Rd

Twinsburg, OH 44087-2198

Crown Hill continues to maintain the original buildings to meet with customers, family members and visitors from other states. When entering the gate, one is greeted by a beautiful fountain whose lights attracted many people in the surrounding communities to come at night and relax to the cooling mist of the fountain. The bronze memorials are flush to the ground, giving the cemetery a “park-like” appeal. There are also many trees that add beauty during all seasons of the year, especially spring and fall.

 

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